Early Childhood / Week 6 / April 20-24

Song of the week:   Little Hoot Owl (sung to: Five Little Ducks)  

       “Who flies around in the dark of night? 

        Who glides on wings o’er silent night?  

        Who eats his dinner by late moonlight? 

        It’s a little hoot owl with his owl eyesight! 

  

        Who-who, who-who, little hoot owl! 

        Who-who, who-who, little hoot owl! 

        Who-who, who-who, little hoot owl! 

        It’s a little hoot owl with his owl eyesight!”        

Daily Learning Goal: 

  • Learning about what birds can use to build nests 

Activity:  

 

  1. Go on a nature walk outside with your child to collect items they could use to build a nest. Before leaving, ask “what do you think we might see on our walk?” 

  1. When you get home, you can add other things from around the house, such as string, stuffing, ribbon and shredded paper.  

  1. You can read the book below before or after going on the walk to look at different pictures of nests and compare them to objects you find on the walk and in your home.  

  1. Make a nest with the objects you found using mud, glue or a paste mixture (½ water, ½ flour) to hold it together. You can also just take a picture of the materials you collected. 

Can Turn In: 

A picture of your nest or nest materials! 

Links: Click on the links for additional activities & resources 

Eight Different Types of Birds’ Nests 

http://www.birdsandblooms.com/birding/attracting-birds/bird-nesting/8-different-bird-nests-how-spot-them/ 

   Inserting image...  

 Hummingbird Nest      Floating Nest          Eagle’s Nest 

This webpage has pictures of 8 different types of bird’s nests. I copied pictures of three of them. Check out the other ones! Birds create such different nests depending on their needs.   

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Look up the story Baby Animals in Nests It will allow you to have the story read aloud. 

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Daily Learning Goal: 

  • Learning where a good place to build a nest is 

Activity: 

  1. Ask your child, “where do you think a good place to build a nest is?” You can write down your child’s answers. Optional: Your child can draw pictures to go with their ideas.  

  1. Watch The Best Nest. (Link to the story below) 

  1. Talk about places in the story and why they weren’t a good place to build a nest. (Ex. “Mr. And Mrs. Bird found several different locations to build a nest. Name one place and tell me why it was not a good location.”) 

    1. SILLY PLACES FOR A NEST (PDF)

  1. Look at the pictures of other places to build nests and talk about which ones would be “good” places and which ones would be “bad” places.  

    1. GOOD AND BAD PLACES FOR NESTS (PDF)

  1. You can use the T-chart below to record your answers.  

    1. PLACES TO BUILD A NEST T-CHART (PDF)

Can Turn In: 

T-Chart 

Links: Click on the links for additional activities & resources 

Read Aloud: The Best Nest by P.D. Eastman

Listen to the story to help you answer the questions above! 

Daily Learning Goal: 

  • Learning about living in a nest 

Activity:

  1. Talk about what we’ve learned about birds’ nests so far (What shape are they?, How do birds use them?, What do they use to build them?, Where do birds build them?).  

  1. Compare a bird’s nest to your home. How are they the same (both are places we live, both protect us, both are places we eat in, etc.)? How are they different? 

  1. Write down the ideas in their journals and the preschoolers can draw pictures to go with the ideas. 

Can Turn In: 

How would you feel if you had to live in a nest? 

 

A list of rhyming words from the story below.  

Links: Click on the links for additional activities & resources  

I Love to Rhyme | English Song for Kids | Rhyming for Children | Jack Hartmann

Follow the directions in the video to help your child with rhyming words.  

Exercise, Rhyme and Freeze | Rhyming Words for Kids | Exercise Song | Jack Hartmann

Follow the directions in the video to help your child with rhyming words! 

Capstone Library

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Look up the story Two Little Blackbirds. You can choose to have this book read-aloud to you.  Listen for the rhyming words in the story (hill/Jill, sky/high, wall/small, park/dark, cloud/loud, car/far). See if your child can name more words to add to the list (i.e. wall, small, ball, hall, tall, mall, fall, call, etc.). 

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Daily Learning Goal: 

  • Learning how birds fly 

Activity: 

 

  1. Ask, “Have you ever seen a bird fly? Where? (or “where could you see a bird fly?”) 

  1. Look at the websites below to look at different birds’ wings and how they fly. 

  1. Talk about how birds have different types of wings (ex. Big/broad, short, medium, small, thin, narrow, pointed tips) that help them fly in different ways. 

  1. Play a Flying Friends Movement game: Take turns choosing different birds and pretending to fly like that bird (ex. Hummingbird would make fast, small movements and can hover by using the figure 8 movements we learned about last week; an eagle uses their wings for a lot of soaring movements). 

Can Turn In: 

What was your favorite bird you pretended to be?

Links: Click on the links for additional activities & resources  

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Look up the story Animal Classification: Birds. It will allow you to have the story read aloud.  

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How Birds Fly 

https://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/resources/303-how-birds-fly 

 

BIRDS IN FLIGHT

This is a neat video that does a good job showing the wings of birds moving!  

Hummingbirds in Flight - The Amazing Hummingbird Flying Motion in Nature

Check out how fast the hummingbirds wings move and how they can just hover! 

Sandhill Crane Video 

National Geographic Is Celebrating New Year's Eve on Instagram ...

This is a longer video about Sandhill cranes, which migrate through Nebraska each spring. It is one of my family’s favorite thing to do! Just watch the birds flying and dancing in the video 

Daily Learning Goal: 

  • Learning why some birds fly at night 

Activity:

  1. Talk about how some birds are nocturnal (they are awake at night and sleep during the day).  

  1. Look at the videos of owls and other animals that are nocturnal.  

  1. Talk about how owls look compared to other birds.  Explain that owls look different (eyes are larger so they can see/fly at night, wings are silent when they fly so they can sneak up and catch small animals to eat, etc.) 

  1. Pretend to fly silently like an owl.  

Can Turn In: 

A picture of you flying like an owl! 

Links: Click on the links for additional activities & resources  

Nocturnal Animals  

https://study.com/academy/lesson/facts-about-nocturnal-animals-lesson-for-kids.html 

This video explains what it means to be nocturnal.  

National Geographic: Owls 

National Geographic Is Celebrating New Year's Eve on Instagram ...

This has an informative video about owls.  

Owl Shows Off Silent Flight Superpower

This is a video looking at how owls fly silently compared to other birds 

Capstone Library

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Look up the book Barn Owl and you can have the story read aloud to you. This book also talks about a few other animals that are nocturnal.  

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Weekly Learning Goal: 

  • Speaking up Assertively 

 

Review with your child the problem-solving steps:  

  1. Calm your body if you are having strong feelings. (Hands on tummy. Say, “stop.” Name your feeling. Take 3 belly breaths.) 

  1. Say what the problem is. (Ex. I can’t find my shirt I want to wear.) 

  1. Thinking of solutions to solve the problem. (Ex. Ask for help finding it. Find a different shirt to wear.) 

 

This week, we are talking about using an assertive voice (strong and respectful) when you need/want something, to solve a problem, or when something happens that you don’t like. Use the scenario and game below to practice doing this with your child. In school, we talk about how an assertive voice isn’t mean or yelling, but it is a strong, little bit louder voice so the person can hear you and listen to you.